ICT News Desk: Antibiotic Prescribing Trends

When U.S. physicians prescribe antibiotics, more than 60 percent of the time they choose some of the strongest types of antibiotics, referred to as "broad spectrum," which are capable of killing multiple kinds of bacteria, University of Utah researchers show in a new study. Unfortunately, more than 25 percent of such prescriptions are useless because the infection stems from a virus, which cannot be treated with antibiotics. This overuse of antibiotics can kill more of the "good" bacteria found in our bodies, which may contribute to the growth of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, according to Dr. Adam L. Hersh, an infectious disease expert at the University of Utah School of Medicine. Hersh's research was published in the Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

When U.S. physicians prescribe antibiotics, more than 60 percent of the time they choose some of the strongest types of antibiotics, referred to as "broad spectrum," which are capable of killing multiple kinds of bacteria, University of Utah researchers show in a new study. Unfortunately, more than 25 percent of such prescriptions are useless because the infection stems from a virus, which cannot be treated with antibiotics. This overuse of antibiotics can kill more of the "good" bacteria found in our bodies, which may contribute to the growth of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, according to Dr. Adam L. Hersh, an infectious disease expert at the University of Utah School of Medicine. Hersh's research was published in the Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

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