Study Shows Physician Judgment is Important in Reducing Rate of RSV-Related Hospitalizations Among High-Risk Infants

HONOLULU -- MedImmune announced today that the company presented results from a retrospective chart review that evaluated the use of Synagis(R) (palivizumab) as a preventive measure against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) disease in high-risk infants.  RSV is a leading cause of viral respiratory infection among preterm infants.

Approximately 4,000 medical records from premature infants born at 32-to-35 weeks gestational age were reviewed.  Fifty percent of those infants received Synagis.  RSV prophylaxis was requested, but not administered in about one-quarter of these infants.  This group was found to have an RSV hospitalization rate of 8.3 percent, which was almost three times the rate of RSV hospitalization among those infants whose physicians did not request RSV prophylaxis (2.9 percent).

"These data support our position that pediatricians should have the final say in the diagnosis and care of their high-risk patients," said Jessie Groothuis, MD, lead author of the study and MedImmune vice president of medical and scientific affairs, infectious disease. "Our findings indicate that after nearly 10 years of use of Synagis, the clinical judgment and experience of physicians serve to identify infants at high risk of RSV hospitalization, and should be relied upon to ensure patients get proper care."

This retrospective chart review, conducted in 10 geographic regions across the United States, included 376 physicians from 2005 to 2006.  Data were presented at a poster session at the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) annual meeting being held this week in Honolulu. 

Source: MedImmune

 

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