Doctor Declares War on HAIs, Patents MRSA-Killing Machine

MEMPHIS, Tenn. -- As a surgeon and clinical instructor, Jeffery Deal, MD, FACS, DTMH, knew firsthand about the growing number of patients contracting and dying from hospital-acquired infections (HAIs). He was also keenly aware that infections are quickly spreading beyond the healthcare system.

A 2004 study supervised by Deal tracked 13,510 admissions at an accredited 450-bed regional hospital. Almost 15 percent, 2,012 patients, acquired an infection. The average length of stay for infected patients increased 9.25 days, and direct hospital costs increased $13,118,000 – more than $29,000 per bed per year.

Deal knew that reducing the biological pool of pathogens would reduce hospital infection. "Our goal was to find a disinfection method that was fast, safe and thorough; used no chemicals; and was automated to eliminate human error and reduce costs." After years of clinical trials, Deal applied for the first of two patents for the TRU-D Total Room Ultraviolet Disinfector. "Our research team developed a fail-safe disinfection method using germ-lethal doses of reflected UV germicidal energy to destroy virus, bacteria and spores within both line-of-site and primary shadow behind bed rails, door knobs and IV poles. TRU-D disinfected every pathogen on every surface, every time," said Deal.

Clinical trials demonstrated that TRU-D destroyed the biological contaminates that cause MRSA, C. diff, VRE, E. coli, Acinetobactor, and a host of other infectious diseases. An unexpected benefit of TRU-D is that the air within the treated space is disinfected by default, preventing airborne pathogens from later re-colonizing sterile surfaces.

Deal licensed the worldwide distribution rights for the patented TRU-D Rapid Room Sterilizer to Lumalier Corporation of Memphis, Tenn., a leader in ultraviolet germicidal irradiation since 1963. Chuck Dunn, president of Lumalier, believes the timing for TRU-D is perfect. "While infection rates are rising at alarming rates, expanded Medicare rules will hold hospitals accountable and liable for acquired infections, costing millions of dollars in non-reimbursed funds. The requirement to publish individual hospital infection rates will expose quality-of-care issues to the public and provide a real choice to patients."

Source: Lumalier Corporation

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