New Hygiene Campaign Focuses on Cleaning Cell Phones

CleenCell Wipes, makers of pre-moistened cleaning cloths for cell phones and smartphones, has announced the launch of MobileHygiene.org, a grassroots campaign aimed at raising awareness about the health effects of using a germ-covered mobile phone, the most handled and personal device more than 200 million Americans own today.(1)

A recent study by Stanford University doctoral student Timothy Julian published in the Journal of Applied Microbiology warns about bacteria accumulation on touchscreen devices, and the health effects to users of contracting harmful pathogens like staph, salmonella, E. coli, influenza viruses and even MRSA, while sharing an iPad or mobile phone.(2)

But the problem is not limited to touchscreens only. Virtually all cell phone users, as their personal usage goes up with more advanced devices, increase their risk to infectious diseases and skin conditions like rashes and acne from the germs that build up on the phone and come in close contact with the hands and face.(3)  

This is a growing problem for all cell phone and smartphone owners as usage goes up says CleenCell CEO Nima Sharifi. Through MobileHygiene.org we are seeking collaborations with the infectious disease and health care communities to initiate research and develop infection prevention guidelines for specific industries like hospitals, restaurants, and offices, and also for individuals and families.

We are now seeing a variety of vulnerable groups using cell phones all day, including doctors, pregnant women, and teens or young adults, explains Sharifi."General awareness and guidelines on how and when to handle a mobile phone from a hygiene standpoint is a fast growing necessity in medical facilities, for food handlers, and for individuals and that's the discussion we are starting with the Mobile Hygiene Movement."

Medical professionals, infectious disease specialists and other professionals who wish to collaborate with the Mobile Hygiene Movement should send an email to: [email protected]

References:

(1) http://www.ctia.org/media/industry_info/index.cfm/AID/10323

(2) http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/health/2013163763_webgerms15.html

(3) http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/Health/story?id=2273311

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