Xavier Research Finds Antimicrobial Bed Cover Cuts Hospital-Acquired Infections

A recently published study in the American Journal of Infection Control, conducted by Xavier University in Cincinnati, found that by using Trinity Guardion Bed Protection System, two long-term acute care hospitals, cut the rate of their hospital-acquired infections in half.

The two hospitals, St. Vincent Seton Specialty Hospital Indianapolis and St. Vincent Seton Specialty Hospital Lafayette, used the bed covers for 14 months, starting in May 2013.

Dr. Edmond Hooker, an associate professor in health services administration at Xavier University, led the research along with Dr. Mark Bochan, an infectious disease physician with Infectious Disease of Indiana.

Hooker’s previous research shows hospital mattresses that are disinfected using current industry-wide practices are still dirty after disinfection. “The hospital mattress is clearly the highest contact point for patients during their hospital stay and hospital linen does not provide a protective barrier for patients,” said Hooker.

The most recent estimates indicate that there are 453,000 Clostridium difficile infections in the U.S. each year, with 29,300 deaths. Estimates suggest that the additional cost of care for these infections, as a result of re-admissions and treatments, may be as high as $3.2 billion.

The current study compared instances of hospital-acquired C. diff by comparing infection rates before and after the two hospitals began using Trinity Guardion’s launderable covers.

“While the facilities had infection rates below the national average prior to initiating use of the laundered covers, both were able to cut these rates in half,” says Hooker. “We controlled for handwashing compliance, patient length of stay, acuity and patient age.”

Source: Trinity Guardion



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