Kimberly-Clarks HAI Prevention Campaign Wins Award

Kimberly-Clark Health Care announced today that the company’s Not On My Watch marketing campaign received a gold IN-AWE Award in the integrated campaign category from the Healthcare Communication & Marketing Association. The award was presented during HCMA’s recent annual conference.

The Not On My Watch campaign was one of 900 entries submitted for consideration to the IN-AWE, or International Awards of Excellence program, which has recognized the best in medical marketing for 23 years. A panel of industry experts evaluated the entries on strategy, creativity and results.  

“We are proud of Not on My Watch and delighted that the campaign has been recognized by such a distinguished awards program as IN-AWE,” said Kimberly-Clark Health Care vice president of global sales and marketing, John Amat. “The multi-faceted campaign was conceived and executed by our in-house creative team to empower our customers through awareness and educational initiatives to prevent healthcare-associated infections and improve the quality of health care around the globe.”

The 2008 Not On My Watch campaign was executed in 27 countries to educate healthcare workers about the prevention of healthcare-associated infections such as ventilator-associated pneumonia and surgical site infections. The integrated campaign included print advertisements, educational materials and the Not On My Watch Web site (www.haiwatch.com), as well as the HAI Education Bus, a mobile classroom that tours the United States to provide accredited continuing education to nurses and other caregivers at their hospital locations.

“Most healthcare-associated infections are preventable, and the campaign was designed to empower doctors and nurses to be diligent, strong and committed to keeping patients safe while in their care, or in other words, on their watch,” said Amat.

 

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