CDC Experts Outline Steps to Prevent the Transmission of Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae

Today on Medscape, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) experts Drs. Raymund Dante and Alice Guh provide step-by-step guidance for healthcare professionals that can help protect their patients by preventing the transmission of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) in their facilities. CRE are resistant to almost all drugs and can contribute to death in 40 percent of patients who become infected. Not only are these organisms associated with high mortality rates, but they have the potential to spread quickly.

Editor's note: To access a slide show on CRE infections from ICT, CLICK HERE.

Today on Medscape, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) experts Drs. Raymund Dante and Alice Guh provide step-by-step guidance for healthcare professionals that can help protect their patients by preventing the transmission of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) in their facilities. CRE are resistant to almost all drugs and can contribute to death in 40 percent of patients who become infected.  Not only are these organisms associated with high mortality rates, but they have the potential to spread quickly.

Healthcare providers should follow five key steps:

1. Place patients currently or previously colonized or infected with CRE on Contact Precautions

2. Wear a gown and gloves when caring for patients with CRE

3. Perform hand hygiene use alcohol-based handrub or wash hands with soap and water before and after contact with patient or their environment

4. Prescribe and use antibiotics wisely

5. Discontinue devices like urinary catheters as soon as no longer necessary

Additionally, CDC announced today the release of its 2012 CRE Toolkit. The updated guidance is divided into recommendations for facility-specific CRE prevention and recommendations for a regional approach to CRE control.

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish