Fewer Cases of Antibiotic-Resistant MRSA Infection in the U.S. in 2011

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An estimated 30,800 fewer invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections occurred in the United States in 2011 compared to 2005, according to a study by Raymund Dantes, MD, MPH, of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and colleagues.
  
The researchers estimated that 80,461 invasive MRSA infections occurred nationally in 2011. Of those, 48,353 were healthcare-associated community-onset infections (HACO); 14,156 were hospital-onset infections; and 16,560 were community-associated infections, according to the results.
 
Since 2005, national estimated incidence rates have decreased 27.7 percent for HACO infections, 54.2 percent for hospital-onset infections and 5 percent for community-onset infections.
 
“Despite these decreases, invasive MRSA infections with onset in the community or outpatient setting remain problematic and represent the majority of invasive MRSA infections. Future research is needed to understand the progression of colonization and non-invasive MRSA infection to invasive infection in outpatient settings. Future prevention efforts should target both community and healthcare transmission, especially among patients with recent hospitalization,” the study concludes.

Reference: JAMA Intern Med. Published online Sept.16, 2013. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2013.10423.
 

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