Two New Cases of Human Infection With H7N9 Avian Influenza Virus are Reported

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On Nov. 28, 2013 and Dec. 6, 2013, the National Health and Family Planning Commission in China notified the World Health Organization (WHO) of two new laboratory-confirmed cases of human infection with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus.

The first patient is a 57-year-old man from Zhejiang Province. He became ill on Nov. 20, 2013 and was admitted to hospital on Nov. 25, 2013. He is currently in critical condition.

The second patient is a 30-year-old man from Zhejiang Province. He became ill on Nov. 29, 2013 and was admitted to hospital on Dec. 5, 2013. He is currently in critical condition. He is the son-in-law of the 57-year-old male from Zhejiang Province.

On Dec. 2, 2013 and Dec. 6 2013, the Centre for Health Protection (CHP), China, Hong Kong SAR, notified WHO of two laboratory-confirmed cases of human infection with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus.

The first patient is a 36-year-old woman who became ill on Nov. 21, 2013. She was admitted to hospital on Nov. 27, 2013 and transferred to an intensive care unit on Nov. 29, 2013. She is currently in critical condition. She had visited Shenzhen, Guangdong province, China on Nov. 17, 2013 and had slaughtered live chickens for cooking and consuming. The investigation is ongoing; close contacts, including family contacts, have so far tested negative for avian influenza A(H7N9).

The second patient is an 80-year-old man with underlying chronic illness who lives with his family in Shenzhen and traveled from Shenzhen to China, Hong Kong SAR, on Dec. 3, 2013 for management of his medical condition. He was admitted to a hospital in China, Hong Kong SAR, on Dec. 3, 2013. He was afebrile on admission and developed fever on Dec. 6, 2013. His condition is currently stable. The investigation is ongoing; close contacts, including family contacts, have so far tested negative for avian influenza A(H7N9). No epidemiological link was identified between the two cases in China, Hong Kong SAR.

So far, there is no evidence of sustained human-to-human transmission.

WHO does not advise special screening at points of entry with regard to this event, nor does it currently recommend any travel or trade restrictions.

Source: WHO

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