Liddell Laboratories Sends Antiviral Medicine to Chinese Hospitals For SARS Testing

MORAGA, Calif. -- Liddell Laboratories announced today that the first shipment of its new antiviral medicine designed for SARS patients will arrive in China and Hong Kong this week for clinical testing.

This medicine, carrying the test-name Anti-Viral 2003, will be evaluated by doctors at the PLA General Hospital in Beijing, Shenzhen Renmin Hospital in Shenzhen and two independent medical clinics in Hong Kong.

In formulating Anti-Viral 2003, Liddell has been able to strengthen the immune-provoking effects of an existing Liddell antiviral medicine. Randy Powers, president of Liddell Laboratories, points out that the effectiveness of Anti-Viral 2003 against SARS will only be determined after detailed clinical testing on SARS patients.

Anti-Viral 2003 consists of several homeopathic ingredients specifically designed to provoke an increased immune response by the body in a manner similar to interferon (a naturally occurring protein which helps the body to counter infection). Ingredients are also present to stimulate T4 counts, ease respiratory inflammation and to lower fever. Because the medicine is safe -- no known negative side effects, drug interactions or contraindications -- it can also be used to complement other medications that may be discovered to treat severe viral infections like SARS or to treat SARS symptoms.

Powers says that in some ways, Anti-Viral 2003 may parallel one of homeopathy's first major successes. In the late 19th century, homeopathic medicines proved far more effective than conventional treatment against another viral infection -- Yellow Fever. With homeopathic treatments, doctors were able to reduce fatality rates from Yellow Fever by more than 50 percent.

"We must look at new and innovative ways to fight emerging diseases," says Powers. "The SARS outbreak was unprecedented in the speed with which it spread. I hope that we are able to contribute to the efforts of health authorities in learning more appropriate responses to emerging infections."

Source: Liddell Laboratories

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