Staphylococcus Aureus


  • Vitamin B3 May Offer New Tool in Fight Against Staph Infections
    A new study suggests that nicotinamide, more commonly known as vitamin B3, may be able to combat some of the antibiotic-resistance staph infections that are increasingly common around the world, have killed thousands and can pose a significant threat to public health. The ...More
    August 27, 2012 Posted in News
  • Chronic Exposure to Staph Bacteria May be Risk Factor for Lupus, Mayo Study Finds
    Chronic exposure to even small amounts of staph bacteria could be a risk factor for the chronic inflammatory disease lupus, Mayo Clinic research shows. Staphylococcus aureus is a germ commonly found on the skin or in the nose, sometimes causing infections. In the Mayo ...More
    August 9, 2012 Posted in News
  • Selenium Controls Staph on Implant Material
    Selenium is an inexpensive element that naturally belongs in the body. It is also known to combat bacteria. Still, it had not been tried as an antibiotic coating on a medical device material. In a new study, Brown University engineers report that when they used selenium ...More
    June 21, 2012 Posted in News
  • Repeated Exposure to Triclosan Reduces Virulence in S. aureus
    Repeated laboratory exposures to triclosan reduced susceptibility to antibiotics in Staphylococcus aureus, but probably not sufficiently to render commonly used antibiotics ineffective, according to a paper in the June 2012 issue of the journal Antimicrobial Agents and ...More
    June 19, 2012 Posted in News
  • Household Contacts of Children with Staph Infections Appear to Have High Rate of MRSA Colonization
    Household contacts of children with Staphylococcus aureus skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) appeared to have a high rate of methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA) colonization compared with the general population, according to a report published in the June issue of ...More
    June 5, 2012 Posted in News
  • Low Levels of Resistant Bacteria Found in Chicago-Area Ambulances
    Treatment areas of ambulances fared well when tested for dangerous bacteria, according to a new study published in the April issue of the American Journal of Infection Control. Approximately 6 percent of sites sampled in Chicago-area ambulances tested positive for ...More
    March 29, 2012 Posted in News, Environmental Hygiene
  • Scientists Investigate a Newly Emerging Staph Strain
    Using genome sequencing and household surveillance, National Institutes of Health (NIH) scientists and their colleagues from Columbia University Medical Center and St. George's University of London have pieced together how a newly emerging type of Staphylococcus aureus ...More
    February 28, 2012 Posted in News
  • Evolution of Staph Superbug Traced Between Humans and Livestock
    A strain of the potentially deadly antibiotic-resistant bacterium known as MRSA has jumped from livestock to humans, according to a new study involving two Northern Arizona University researchers. Paul Keim, Regents’ professor and director of NAU’s Center for Microbial ...More
    February 21, 2012 Posted in News
  • Rainforest Plant Combats Multidrug-Resistant Bacterial Strains
    Aggressive infections in hospitals are an increasing health problem worldwide. Now, a young Danish scientist has found a natural substance in a Chilean rainforest plant that effectively supports the effect of traditional treatment with antibiotics. Jes Gitz Holler, from the ...More
    February 20, 2012 Posted in News
  • New Test Uses Mass Spectrometry to Rapidly Detect Staph Infections
    Researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have developed a new laboratory test that can rapidly identify the bacterium responsible for staph infections. This new test takes advantage of unique isotopic ...More
    January 12, 2012 Posted in News