Staphylococcus Aureus


  • Chemists Document Workings of Key Staph Enzyme and How to Block It
    Researchers have determined the structure and mechanism of an enzyme that performs the crucial first step in the formation of cholesterol and a key virulence factor in staph bacteria. Chemists at the University of Illinois and collaborators in Taiwan studied a type of ...More
    January 19, 2011 Posted in News
  • Staph Bacteria Bind Best to Human Hemoglobin
    Staph bacteria feed on blood because they need the iron that's hidden away inside red blood cells to grow and cause infections. It turns out that these microbial vampires prefer the taste of human blood, Vanderbilt University scientists have discovered. ...More
    December 16, 2010 Posted in News
  • Staph Superantigens Could Be Culprit Behind Several Illnesses
    Superantigens, the toxins produced by staphylococcus bacteria, are more complex than previously believed, reveals a team of researchers from the University of Gothenburg in an article published today in the journal Nature Communications. Their discovery shows that the ...More
    November 29, 2010 Posted in News
  • Scientists Trick Bacteria with Small Molecules
    A team of Yale University scientists has engineered the cell wall of the Staphylococcus aureus bacteria, tricking it into incorporating foreign small molecules and embedding them within the cell wall. ...More
    October 7, 2010 Posted in News
  • Serendipity Contributes to MRSA Susceptibility Findings
    Duke University Medical Center researchers have found two genes in mice which might help identify why some people are more susceptible than others to potentially deadly infections from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The researchers uncovered important ...More
    September 3, 2010 Posted in News
  • Treatment for S. aureus Skin Infection Works in Mouse Model
    Scientists from the National Institutes of Health and University of Chicago have found a promising treatment method that in laboratory mice reduces the severity of skin and soft-tissue damage caused by USA300, the leading cause of community-associated Staphylococcus aureus ...More
    August 31, 2010 Posted in News
  • Researchers Develop Coating That Safely Kills MRSA on Contact
    Building on an enzyme found in nature, researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have created a nanoscale coating for surgical equipment, hospital walls, and other surfaces which safely eradicates methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), the bacteria ...More
    August 17, 2010 Posted in News
  • Bacteriuria May Identify Patients with More Severe Bacteremia
    When Staphylococcus aureus is isolated in urine, it is thought to usually represent hematogenous spread. Because such spread might have special clinical significance, Shingo Chihara and colleagues evaluated predictors and outcomes of S. aureus bacteriuria among patients ...More
    July 30, 2010 Posted in News
  • NIH Scientists Identify New Toxin That May be Key to MRSA Severity
    A research project to identify all the surface proteins of USA300—the most common community-associated strain of the methicillin-resistant form of the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)—has resulted in the identification and isolation of a plentiful new toxin that ...More
    July 19, 2010 Posted in News
  • Study Examines, Compares Bacteria in the Nose and Throat
    Scientists have completed the most comprehensive comparative analysis to date of bacterial communities inhabiting the human nose and throat, which could provide new insights into why some individuals become colonized with pathogens while others do not. They release their ...More
    June 21, 2010 Posted in News, Disinfection & Sterilization