Staphylococcus Aureus


  • Serendipity Contributes to MRSA Susceptibility Findings
    Duke University Medical Center researchers have found two genes in mice which might help identify why some people are more susceptible than others to potentially deadly infections from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The researchers uncovered important ...More
    September 3, 2010 Posted in News
  • Treatment for S. aureus Skin Infection Works in Mouse Model
    Scientists from the National Institutes of Health and University of Chicago have found a promising treatment method that in laboratory mice reduces the severity of skin and soft-tissue damage caused by USA300, the leading cause of community-associated Staphylococcus aureus ...More
    August 31, 2010 Posted in News
  • Researchers Develop Coating That Safely Kills MRSA on Contact
    Building on an enzyme found in nature, researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have created a nanoscale coating for surgical equipment, hospital walls, and other surfaces which safely eradicates methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), the bacteria ...More
    August 17, 2010 Posted in News
  • Bacteriuria May Identify Patients with More Severe Bacteremia
    When Staphylococcus aureus is isolated in urine, it is thought to usually represent hematogenous spread. Because such spread might have special clinical significance, Shingo Chihara and colleagues evaluated predictors and outcomes of S. aureus bacteriuria among patients ...More
    July 30, 2010 Posted in News
  • NIH Scientists Identify New Toxin That May be Key to MRSA Severity
    A research project to identify all the surface proteins of USA300—the most common community-associated strain of the methicillin-resistant form of the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)—has resulted in the identification and isolation of a plentiful new toxin that ...More
    July 19, 2010 Posted in News
  • Study Examines, Compares Bacteria in the Nose and Throat
    Scientists have completed the most comprehensive comparative analysis to date of bacterial communities inhabiting the human nose and throat, which could provide new insights into why some individuals become colonized with pathogens while others do not. They release their ...More
    June 21, 2010 Posted in News, Disinfection & Sterilization
  • Study Examines ICU Outbreak of Staph Aureus With Resistance to Methicillin and Linezolid
    An outbreak of infection due to linezolid and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LRSA) in 12 intensive care unit patients in Spain was associated with transmission within the hospital and extensive usage of the antibiotic linezolid, often used for the treatment of ...More
    June 8, 2010 Posted in News
  • Risk of Post-Surgical Staph Infection May Depend on Procedure
    Patients may be at greater risk of developing invasive Staphylococcus aureus infections, following cardiothoracic and neurosurgical procedures compared with orthopedic or plastic surgical procedures according to a study published in the July issue of Infection Control and ...More
    June 2, 2010 Posted in News
  • Surprising Infection-Inducing Mechanism Found in Bacteria
    Research appearing in Nature, with the participation of doctors Susana Campoy and Jordi Barbé from the Department of Genetics and Microbiology at UAB, demonstrates that bacteria have a surprising mechanism to transfer virulent genes, causing infections. The research ...More
    May 18, 2010 Posted in News
  • Who is at Risk for MRSA?
    A multi-center study led by a researcher at Rhode Island Hospital has determined that long-term elder care, HIV-infected and hemodialysis patients are at increased risk of carrying methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in their nose. The study also found that ...More
    April 20, 2010 Posted in News