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2017-18 Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness was 36 Percent

Flannery and Chung, et al. (2018) report that so far this season, influenza A(H3N2) viruses have predominated, but other influenza viruses are also circulating.

Effectiveness of seasonal influenza vaccine can vary by season and has generally been higher against influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and B viruses than against A(H3N2) viruses. Flannery and Chung, et al. (2018) report that so far this season, influenza A(H3N2) viruses have predominated, but other influenza viruses are also circulating. Based on data from 4,562 children and adults with acute respiratory illness enrolled during November 2, 2017–February 3, 2018, at five study sites with outpatient medical facilities in the United States, the overall estimated effectiveness of the 2017–18 seasonal influenza vaccine for preventing medically attended, laboratory-confirmed influenza virus infection was 36 percent.

The CDC continues to monitor influenza vaccine effectiveness. Influenza vaccination is still recommended; vaccination reduces the risk for influenza illnesses and serious complications. Treatment with influenza antiviral medications, where appropriate, is especially important this season.

In the United States, annual vaccination against seasonal influenza is recommended for all persons aged ≥6 months (1). During each influenza season since 2004–05, CDC has estimated the effectiveness of seasonal influenza vaccine to prevent laboratory-confirmed influenza associated with medically attended acute respiratory illness (ARI). This report uses data from 4,562 children and adults enrolled in the U.S. Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness Network (U.S. Flu VE Network) during November 2, 2017–February 3, 2018. During this period, overall adjusted vaccine effectiveness (VE) against influenza A and influenza B virus infection associated with medically attended ARI was 36% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 27%–44%). Most (69%) influenza infections were caused by A(H3N2) viruses. VE was estimated to be 25% (CI = 13% to 36%) against illness caused by influenza A(H3N2) virus, 67% (CI = 54%–76%) against A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, and 42% (CI = 25%–56%) against influenza B viruses. These early VE estimates underscore the need for ongoing influenza prevention and treatment measures. CDC continues to recommend influenza vaccination because the vaccine can still prevent some infections with currently circulating influenza viruses, which are expected to continue circulating for several weeks. Even with current vaccine effectiveness estimates, vaccination will still prevent influenza illness, including thousands of hospitalizations and deaths. Persons aged ≥6 months who have not yet been vaccinated this season should be vaccinated.

To continue reading from MMWR, CLICK HERE.

Reference: Flannery B, Chung JR, et al. Interim Estimates of 2017–18 Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness — United States, February 2018. MMWR. Feb. 16, 2018. 67(6);180–185.

Source: CDC

To read a statement from FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, MD, on the efficacy of the 2017-2018 influenza vaccine, CLICK HERE.

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