GenVec and U.S. Naval Medical Research Center to Collaborate on Vaccine for Dengue Fever

GenVec, Inc. announces that it has entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement with the U.S. Naval Medical Research Center (NMRC) to support their dengue fever vaccine research. Under a separate contract with the Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine, Inc., GenVec will receive funding for the development and preparation of vaccines related to this program.

GenVec will design and manufacture the next generation vaccine candidates which will utilize GenVec's adenovector technology and be manufactured utilizing GenVec's proprietary cell line. NMRC will be responsible for pre-clinical animal studies including studies in non-human primates.

GenVec anticipates that it will recognize approximately $530,000 of revenue associated with the completion of work under the agreement with the Jackson Foundation in 2011.

"This new program supports our strategy of working with partners to generate new product opportunities for GenVec," says Dr. Paul Fischer, GenVec's president and CEO. "This new application also highlights the ability of our vectors to stimulate immune responses to multiple antigens."

Dengue fever is a viral disease spread by mosquitoes that historically affected 50 million to 100 million people each year. The virus is found in tropical and sub-tropical climates worldwide, mostly in urban and semi-urban areas. In recent years Dengue fever has spread to many new geographic locations, with cases confirmed in Florida and explosive outbreaks having occurred in Brazil and Venezuela. Symptoms are flu-like and generally occur three to 14 days after being bitten by an infected mosquito. Symptoms may include fever, headache, rash, eye pain and body aches. Dengue hemorrhagic fever is the most severe form of the disease and it can be fatal. There is no current vaccine or treatment for dengue fever.

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish