Bacterial

October 2019 Bug of the Month

September 25, 2019

Bug of the Month helps educate readers about existing and emerging pathogens of clinical importance in healthcare facilities today.

August 2019 Bug of the Month

August 2, 2019

Bug of the Month helps educate readers about existing and emerging pathogens of clinical importance in healthcare facilities today. Each column explores the Bug of the Month's etiology, the infections it can cause, the modes of transmission, and ways to fight its spread.

New Method Increases Accuracy of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Identification

July 30, 2019

The bacterial genus Mycobacterium has the dubious honor of including species responsible for two of the best-known chronic human infectious diseases: tuberculosis and leprosy. But unlike their more famous cousins, for which effective treatment strategies have long been available, it is the 200 or so lesser known Mycobacterium species that are currently causing a resurgence in pulmonary diseases in recent times.

For Salmonella Detection, Genomic Tool Emerges as a Key

July 29, 2019

The world's food supply will become safer as the food industry shifts to high-resolution, whole-genome sequencing - which examines the full DNA of a given organism all at once. This move to make sequencing ubiquitous will lead to the consistently reliable detection of salmonella.

When Flesh-Eating Bacteria Move into New Waters: How to Stay Safe

July 29, 2019

Infections caused by the bacterium Vibrio vulnificus – known as “flesh eating” bacteria – are becoming more common in northern waters, whose surface temperatures are rising due to climate change. A recent study showed that infections are increasing in areas further north such as the Delaware Bay.

Study Uncovers Weakness in C. diff Toxin

July 16, 2019

A new study, led by researchers from the University of California, Irvine (UCI), uncovers the long-sought-after, three-dimensional structure of a toxin primarily responsible for devastating Clostridium difficile infection (CDI).

Stripping Down Bacterial Armor: A New Way to Fight Anthrax

July 15, 2019

A new study led by Dr. Antonella Fioravanti in the lab of professor Han Remaut (VIB-VUB Center for Structural Biology) has shown that removing the armor of the bacterium that causes anthrax slows its growth and negatively affects its ability to cause disease.

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