• Evidence Supports Call Not to Use Certain Type of Anti-viral Drugs for Flu
    Recent, additional data show that the prevalence of adamantane-resistant influenza A viruses is high across the United States, according to a new study published online today by JAMA because of its public health importance. The study will be published in the Feb. 22 print ...More
    February 3, 2006 Posted in News
  • Ironing Out New Details of Tuberculosis Infection
    Scientists in India, led by a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) international research scholar, have identified five key genes that enable Mycobacterium tuberculosis to acquire the iron it needs to sustain growth and promote infection. “Targeting genes within this ...More
    February 3, 2006 Posted in News
  • New Teams Join Network to Model Pandemic Flu, Other Infectious Outbreaks
    Four new scientific teams joined an international research network developing computer-based simulations of pandemic flu and other infectious disease outbreaks, the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), a component of the National Institutes of Health, ...More
    February 2, 2006 Posted in News
  • Soaring UK Rates of Chlamydia Infection Partly Caused by More Sensitive Tests
    More sensitive testing methods might account for some of the sharp increase in reported Chlamydia trachomatis infections, suggests research in the journal Sexually Transmitted Infections. Chlamydia is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the developed world, ...More
    February 2, 2006 Posted in News
  • Text Messaging Speeds Up Treatment for Chlamydia Infection
    Text messaging the results of a Chlamydia test speeds up treatment for the infection and cuts down on staff time, suggests a six-month study in the journal Sexually Transmitted Infections. The sexual health clinic at London’s Chelsea and WestminsterHospital tried out a text ...More
    February 2, 2006 Posted in News
  • New Course on AIDS Explores 'The Perfect Ecology' of a Killer
    Rick Keller, an assistant professor of medical history, explains the public health context in which HIV/AIDS was first reported by the Centers for Disease Control 25 years ago. Keller is team-teaching an interdisciplinary course on the global AIDS pandemic with Maria ...More
    February 1, 2006 Posted in News
  • Biologists Build Better Software, Beat Path to Viral Knowledge
    Pictured are images of Epsilon 15, a virus that infects the bacterium Salmonella. From the left-side cross section of the viral particle's interior, obtained with an advanced magnifier called a cryo-electron microscope, a team including Purdue structural biologist Wen Jiang ...More
    February 1, 2006 Posted in News
  • Challenges and Benefits of Double-Gloving in Surgery
    Challenges and Benefits of Double-Gloving in Surgery By Deborah Davis, PhD Ronald L. Nichols, MD, the William Henderson professor of surgery-emeritus and professor of microbiology and immunology at Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans has stated, ...More
  • OUTBREAK INVESTIGATION
    OUTBREAK INVESTIGATION An ICP’s Worst Nightmare By Kathy Dix Recent bioterrorism scares have shone a spotlight on emerging diseases and raised fears of outbreaks that are due to global enemies. Anthrax and smallpox were at the forefront of these scares, but even excluding ...More
    February 1, 2006 Posted in Articles
  • APPROACHES TO INFECTION CONTROL
    APPROACHES TO INFECTION CONTROLActive Surveillance Culture as a Promising New Tool By Gerri Hall, PhD, and Diane Flayhart, MT (ASCP), MS “A horrific experience” is Michael Bennett’s description of his father’s four-month stay in five hospitals in 2004. Mark Bennett was a ...More
    February 1, 2006 Posted in Articles