• SPD Personnel Should be Aware of the Dangers of Hepatitis
    SPD Personnel Should be Aware of the Dangers of Hepatitis By Dottie Conroy, RN, BS, ACSP, CSPDM MY MOTHER, AT THE AGE OF 35, delivered me by Cesearean section due to eight internal and external uterine fibroid tumors. Two were larger than I was at birth. Needless to say, ...More
    October 1, 2005 Posted in Articles
  • The Role of PPE in Contact Transfer
    The Role of PPE in Contact Transfer Part one in a series. By Wava Truscott, PhD THINK FOR A MOMENT ABOUT THIS ROUTINE SCENARIO. A healthcare worker (HCW) enters the room of a patient who has an antibiotic-resistant infection such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus ...More
    October 1, 2005 Posted in Articles, Hand Hygiene, PPE & Standard Precautions
  • WHO Expert to Work With the UN System on Avian and Human Influenza
    GENEVA -- The United Nations Secretary General has appointed Dr. David Nabarro, one of the most senior public health experts at the World Health Organization (WHO), to lead coordination of the UN response to avian influenza and a possible human influenza pandemic. The ...More
    September 30, 2005 Posted in News
  • Canine Flu Story Overhyped by Media, Expert Says
    BLACKSBURG, Va. -- An internationally recognized expert on infectious diseases in greyhounds says recent media reports of a canine flu epidemic have "greatly inflated the significance" of the scientific paper on which the reports were based. Dr. Brad Fenwick, vice president ...More
    September 29, 2005 Posted in News
  • ASHES Award Winners Announced at Conference
    PHOENIX -- The American Society for Healthcare Environmental Services (ASHES) announced today that Pat Hockenberger has been named the winner of the 2005 Phoenix award.  This award recognizes an individual who has made a lasting impact through outstanding contributions ...More
    September 29, 2005 Posted in News
  • Training Local Health Workers Improves TB Control in South Africa
    Educational outreach training for health workers improves the quality of tuberculosis care and control without requiring extra staff, finds a study from South Africa in this week’s British Medical Journal. Tuberculosis is a growing problem in lower and middle income ...More
    September 29, 2005 Posted in News
  • Why Are So Few HIV/AIDS Trials Conducted in Africa?
    People in sub-Saharan Africa carry the heaviest burden of HIV and AIDS, yet very few trials have been conducted on the African continent over the past two decades, say researchers in this week’s British Medical Journal. This study confirms previous findings that HIV/AIDS ...More
    September 29, 2005 Posted in News
  • Why Are the Best Malaria Drugs Not Being Used in Africa?
    Despite changes in policy in many African countries, most cases of malaria are still treated with old drugs that often fail, say researchers in this week’s British Medical Journal. The steady increase of drug-resistant malaria across Africa has prompted many countries to ...More
    September 29, 2005 Posted in News
  • Intermittent Prophylaxis Prevents Malaria in Infants
    Giving infants preventive treatment for malaria can reduce malaria and anemia even in seasonal, high transmission areas such as Ghana, finds a study in this week’s British Medical Journal. But concern exists about a possible rebound when treatment is stopped, warn the ...More
    September 29, 2005 Posted in News
  • Women in Uganda Have a Higher Risk of HIV Infection During Pregnancy
    In the Rakai district of Uganda pregnant women have higher risk of acquiring HIV than women who are not pregnant, according to a study published in this week's issue of The Lancet. The researchers controlled for behavioral factors that could affect HIV acquisition and still ...More
    September 29, 2005 Posted in News