CDC Releases 2017 Update to SSI Prevention Guideline

Article

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)'s HICPAC has published its Guideline for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infection, 2017, in the journal JAMA Surgery. This targeted systematic review of the literature synthesizes evidence-based recommendations for the prevention of SSIs.

The authors advise, "Before surgery, patients should shower or bathe (full body) with soap (antimicrobial or nonantimicrobial) or an antiseptic agent on at least the night before the operative day. Antimicrobial prophylaxis should be administered only when indicated based on published clinical practice guidelines and timed such that a bactericidal concentration of the agents is established in the serum and tissues when the incision is made. In cesarean section procedures, antimicrobial prophylaxis should be administered before skin incision. Skin preparation in the operating room should be performed using an alcohol-based agent unless contraindicated. For clean and clean-contaminated procedures, additional prophylactic antimicrobial agent doses should not be administered after the surgical incision is closed in the operating room, even in the presence of a drain. Topical antimicrobial agents should not be applied to the surgical incision. During surgery, glycemic control should be implemented using blood glucose target levels less than 200 mg/dL, and normothermia should be maintained in all patients. Increased fraction of inspired oxygen should be administered during surgery and after extubation in the immediate postoperative period for patients with normal pulmonary function undergoing general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation. Transfusion of blood products should not be withheld from surgical patients as a means to prevent SSI."

To read the updated guideline in JAMA Surgery, CLICK HERE.

Reference: Berríos-Torres SI, et al. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Guideline for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infection, 2017. JAMA Surg.  Published online May 3, 2017. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2017.0904



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