FDA Rule Requires Bar Codes on Drugs and Blood to Help Reduce Errors

Article

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- As part of a wide-ranging effort to improve patient safety, today the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) finalized a rule requiring bar codes on the labels of thousands of human drugs and biological products. The measure aims to protect patients from preventable medication errors by helping ensure that health professionals give patients the right drugs at the appropriate dosages.

The bar codes -- similar to those on food packages and other consumer goods -- will be required on most prescription drugs and certain over-the-counter drugs. The rule also requires machine-readable information on container labels of blood and blood components intended for transfusion.

FDA estimates that the rule will help prevent nearly 500,000 adverse events and transfusion errors while saving $93 billion in health costs over 20 years.

In March 2003, FDA also proposed a rule designed to improve reporting requirements for safety problems involving medicines.

Source: FDA

Related Videos
Andrea Flinchum, 2024 president of the Certification Board of Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc (CBIC) explains the AL-CIP Certification at APIC24
Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology  (Image credit: APIC)
Lila Price, CRCST, CER, CHL, the interim manager for HealthTrust Workforce Solutions; and Dannie O. Smith III, BSc, CSPDT, CRCST, CHL, CIS, CER, founder of Surgicaltrey, LLC, and a central processing educator for Valley Health System
Jill Holdsworth, MS, CIC, FAPIC, CRCST, NREMT, CHL
Jill Holdsworth, MS, CIC, FAPIC, CRCSR, NREMT, CHL, and Katie Belski, BSHCA, CRCST, CHL, CIS
Baby visiting a pediatric facility  (Adobe Stock 448959249 by Rawpixel.com)
Antimicrobial Resistance (Adobe Stock unknown)
Anne Meneghetti, MD, speaking with Infection Control Today
Patient Safety: Infection Control Today's Trending Topic for March
Related Content