Risk Factors, Assessment Play Into Orthopedic SSI Prevention

July 20, 2011

Now that surgical site infections (SSIs) are being targeted for reduction by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) in its Action Plan to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections, hospitals have even greater incentive to address orthopedic-related SSIs which present immense costs and significant morbidity and mortality. According to the Guide to the Elimination of Orthopedic Surgical Site Infections, APIC's latest elimination guide released in January, it is estimated that between 6,000 and 20,000 orthopedic SSIs occur annually, increasing the average hospital stay by two weeks and increasing the costs of these procedures by as much as 300 percent.

Now that surgical site infections (SSIs) are being targeted for reduction by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) in its Action Plan to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections, hospitals have even greater incentive to address orthopedic-related SSIs which present immense costs and significant morbidity and mortality. According to the Guide to the Elimination of Orthopedic Surgical Site Infections, APIC's latest elimination guide released in January, it is estimated that between 6,000 and 20,000 orthopedic SSIs occur annually, increasing the average hospital stay by two weeks and increasing the costs of these procedures by as much as 300 percent.