APRIL REFERENCES

April 1, 2003

APRIL REFERENCES

APRIL REFERENCES

"ENDOSCOPY AND INFECTION CONTROL," BY NANCY CHOBIN, RN, CSPDMAND SUE ELLEN ERICKSON, RN, MSN, CNOR, PAGE 14

1. Alfa. Flexible endoscope reprocessing - staff training verification toensure reproducibility. Infection Control and Sterilization Technology. May1999.

2. American Society for Testing Materials. Standard practice for cleaning anddisinfection of flexible fiberoptic and video endoscopes used in the examinationof the hollow viscera. July 1994.

3. Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology. APICGuideline for Infection Prevention and Control in Flexible Endoscopy. AmericanJournal Infection Control. 2000:28:138-55.

4. Davis D, Zadinsky J and Carrell C. Flexible endoscopy: a compliancetraining program. Infection Control and Sterilization Technology. November 1998.

5. Infections from Endoscopes Inadequately Reprocessed by an AutomatedEndoscope Reprocessing System. FDA and CDC Public Health Advisory. September1999.

6. Rutula W., et al. Draft guildelines for disinfection and sterilization inhealthcare facilities. Healthcare Infection Control Practices. CDC Web site.June 2002.

7. Scope Cleaning Procedures Debated. USA Today. April 8, 2002.

8. Society for Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates, Inc. Standards forInfection Control and Reprocessing of Flexible Gastrointestinal Endoscopes.1997.

9. Wild Iris Medical Education. Endoscope Cleaning. Managing InfectionControl. September 2002.

"MAKE CORRECT TAPE APPLICATION A STICKING POINT," BY KELLY M.PYREK, PAGE 16

1. Surgical Tape (Market Choices). RN. June 2002. www.findarticles.com/cf_0/m3235/6_65/87469046/print.jhtml

2. Marks JG Jr. and Rainey MA. Cutaneous reactions to surgical preparationsand dressings. Contact Dermatitis. 1984 Jan;10(1):1-5.

3. Rodeheaver GT, McLane M, West L and Edlich RF. Evaluation of surgicaltapes for wound closures. J Surg Res. 1985 Sep;39(3):251-7.

"NEW REGULATIONS COMPOUND CHALLENGES POSED BY FLUID WASTE," BYSTANLEY R SHELVER, RN, MHA, PAGE 22

1. OSHA Regulations, 29 CFR Part 1910.1030, Occupational Exposure toBloodborne Pathogens, 1991.

2. DOT's "Final Rule for Hazardous Materials: Revision to Standards forInfectious Substances, 49 CFR Part 171."

3. Memorandum of Understanding Between the United States EnvironmentalProtection Agency and the American Hospital Association, June 24, 1998.

4. Survey of Infectious Fluid Disposal Practices, Dornoch Medical Systems,Inc., April 2000.

"BIOLOAD DOESN'T HAVE TO BE A BURDEN," BY BECKI HARTER CST,CRCST, PAGE 42

1. Sherman M. (1998). Medical Device Packaging Handbook (Second Edition). NewYork: Basel. Marcel Dekker, Inc.

2. Reichert M and Young JH. (1997). Sterilization Technology(SecondEdition),Maryland,Gaithersburg:Aspen Publishers, Inc.

3. Ninemeie JD. (1998) Central Service Technical Manual (fifthedition-revised and expanded), Chicago,Ill. IAHCSMM.

4. Association for the advancement of Medical Instrumentation, ANSI/AAMIST33-1996, Arlington,Va.

5. Harter B. (2003). Sterilization By Design: Processing of Medical Devicesand Instrumentation, Application of basic principles. Indianapolis, Ind.

6. Lenntech. Biofilm removal and control,. Lenntech water treatment and airpurification holding B.V.,2629 HH Deift, The Netherlands.

7. Hughes CA. SPS Medical Supply Corp, Rush, N.Y.

"PREVENTION OF SURGICAL SITE INFECTIONS," BY BONNIE BARNARD,MPH, CIC, PAGE 57

1. Martone WJ, Jarvis WR, Culver DH, Haley RW. Incidence and nature ofendemic and epidemic nosocomial infections. In: Bennet JV, Brachman PS, eds.Hospital Infections. 3rd ed. Boston: Little, Brown and Co; 1992. P. 577-96.

1a. Whitehouse JD, et. al. The impact of surgical site infections followingorthopedic surgery at a community hospital and a university hospital: adversequality of life, excess length of stay and extra cost. Infect Control HospEpidemiol. 2002;23:183-189.

1b. Perencevich EN, Sands KE, Cosgrove SE, Guadagnoli E, Meara E, Platt R.Health and ecdonomic impact of surgical site infections diagnosed after hospitaldischarge. Emerging Infectious Diseases 2003; 9(2):196-203.

2.Mangram AJ, Horan TC, Pearson ML, Silver LC, Jarvis WR, The HospitalInfection Control Practices Advisory Committee. Guideline for prevention ofsurgical site infection, 1999. Infec Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1999;20(4):247-280.

www.cdc.gov/ncidod/hip/SSI/SSI.pdf

3. Centers for Disease Control National Nosocomial Infections SurveillanceSystem (NNIS) www.cdc.gov/ncidod/hip/NNIS/@nnis.htm

4. No author. Antimicrobial prophylaxis in surgery. Med Lett Drugs Ther.October 29, 2001;(1116):92-97.

5. Dellinger EP, Gross PA, Barrett TL, Krause PJ, Martone WF, McGowan

WE, Sweet RL, Wenzel RP. Quality standard for antimicrobial prophylaxis insurgical procedures. Released in 1994 (reviewed 1998). Clin Infect Dis. 1994Mar;18(3):422-7. www.journals.uchicago.edu/IDSA/guidelines/0422.pdf

6. Harbarth S. Circulation. 2000; 101:2916-21.

6a. Kurz A, Sessler DI, Lenhardt R. Perioperative normothermia to reduce theincidence of surgical-wound infection and shorten hospitalization. N Engl J Med.1996; 334(19):1209-1216.

7. Latham R, Lancaster AD, Covington JF, Pirolo JS, Thomas CS Jr. Theassociation of diabetes and glucose control with surgical-site infections amongcardiothoracic surgery patients. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2001;22:607-612.http://www.slackinc.com/general/iche/stor1001/10lat.htm

8. Furnary AP, Zerr KJ, Grunkemeier GL, and Starr A. Continuous intravenousinsulin infusion reduces the incidence of deep sternal wound infection indiabetic patients after cardiac surgical procedures. Ann Thorac Surg. 199967:352-360.

9. Greif R, Akca O, Horn EP, Kurz A, Sessler DI. Supplemental perioperativeoxygen to reduce the incidence of wound infection. NEJM. 2000;342(3):161-7.

10. McConkey SJ, L'Ecuyer PB, Murphy DM, Leet TL, Sundt TM, Fraser VJ.Results of a comprehensive infection control program for reducing surgical-siteinfections in coronary artery bypass surgery. Infec Control Hosp Epidemiol.1999;20(8):238-247.

11. Richards C, Emori TG, Peavy G, Gaynes R. Promoting quality throughmeasurement of performance and response: prevention success stories. EmergingInfectious Diseases. 2001;7(2):299-301.

OTHER REFERENCES AND RESOURCES:

1. Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC)www.apic.org

2. Association of periOperative Registered Nurses. Standards, RecommendedPractices and Guidelines, 2002.

3. Consensus paper on the surveillance of surgical wound infections. TheSociety for Hospital Epidemiology of America; the Association for Practitionersin Infection Control; the Centers for Disease Control; and the SurgicalInfection Society. Infec Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1992;20:263-270.

4. SHEA (Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America) www.shea-online.org

5. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services - Centers for Disease Control

Surgical Infection Prevention Project, www.surgicalinfectionprevention.org