CDC, FDA and States Investigating Multi-state E. coli Outbreak

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and several states are investigating an outbreak of 12 illnesses of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) O157:H7 reported from several states. Epidemiologic information collected to date indicates that I. M. Healthy brand SoyNut Butter products might be contaminated with this harmful bacteria and are a likely source of this outbreak. CDC recommends that people not eat or serve these products. 

The symptoms of STEC infections vary but often include severe stomach cramps, diarrhea (often bloody), and vomiting. Most people get better within 5–7 days, but some infections are severe or even life-threatening. Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a type of kidney failure, is a potentially life-threatening complication of E. coli O157 infection. Very young children and the elderly are more likely to develop severe illness and HUS than others, but even healthy older children and young adults can become seriously ill.
 
Contact your healthcare provider if you have diarrhea that lasts for more than 3 days, or is accompanied by high fever, blood in the stool, or so much vomiting that you cannot keep liquids down and you pass very little urine. More information about E. coli can be found at www.cdc.gov/ecoli/.

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